Facts and Statistics

Close
  • Worldwide Church
  • Select a Continent
  • Select a Country
  • Select a State or Province
    Show:Hide:
    Show mapHide map

    Click here for the Italy Mormon Newsroom

    No statistics are available at this time.

    History

    Members have been in Italy since 1850.

    First among missionaries to Italy in 1850 was Elder Lorenzo Snow, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. He and three other missionaries preached to the French Protestants in Piedmont Valley. Several Church publications were translated into French. By 1855, 50 members had emigrated to America and membership was 64. Progress was interrupted by the anti-Church activity outside of the Valley and the heavy legal requirements. Finally, after years of unsuccessful attempts, in 1964 the Church was allowed to resume missionary efforts. The first congregation of Latter-day Saints in Italy was organized on March 20, 1966, in Brescia.

    The first Italian mission was opened in Florence on August 2, 1966. After that time missionaries were sent to many other Italian cities and the number of the members grew rapidly. By 1967, there were 66 members divided into two Italian congregations and seven congregations with both Italians and United States military servicemen. In 1985, membership was 12,000, and in 1990, it was 14,000.

    In 1993, Italy gave formal legal status to the Church. That December, 50 Church missionaries were invited to sing on Vatican Radio from St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican. In 2012, the Italian government granted the Church official status as a church and “partner of the state.” This legal status gives the Church greater freedom to do more good, both as a church and as a social institution.

    In October 2016, Massimo De Feo, as first-ever Italian native, was called to be a General Authority Seventy.

    On 9 March 2019, Russell M. Nelson, President of the Church of Jesus Christ became the first leader of the Church to have a formal audience at the Vatican with Pope Francis, head of the Roman Catholic Church. He was accompanied among others by M. Russell Ballard, Acting President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and Massimo De Feo, as the Church’s only Italian General Authority Seventy.

    Between 10-12 March 2019, the Rome Italy Temple was dedicated in a total of seven dedicatory sessions. Russell M. Nelson, President of the Church of Jesus Christ conducted the symbolic cornerstone ceremony and read the dedicatory prayer. All living Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ were participating in these dedicatory services. The Rome Italy Temple dedication marked the first time in history when the entire First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles gathered to one location outside of the United States.

    For Journalist Use Only

    Ether Simoncini

    +39 338 570 9013

    Email

    Raimondo Castellani

    Cell. +39 339 601 6243

    E-mail

    The nightly preachings of George J. Adams brought an audience of some 1,200 in Charlestown, Massachusetts, in 1843. At that time, there were some 14 branches (small congregations) of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the Boston area. Eleven years prior, the first missionaries for the Church arrived in Boston to organize congregations. Church President Joseph Smith passed through Boston on his way to Washington, D.C., in 1839. After President Smith was martyred in 1844, several members in Massachusetts joined the mass exodus west, and missionary work in the state slowed.

    In 1894, one year after the area was reopened to missionaries, Church membership was 96. A decade later, missionaries encountered hostilities toward the Church during the highly-publicized United States Senate hearings on Church leader and Senator-elect Reed Smoot, and police disallowed missionaries to hold open-air meetings. By 1930, membership was nearly 360, some of whom were recently-returned missionaries studying at Harvard University. Cambridge, Massachusetts, became the headquarters for the New England States Mission. A Church building was dedicated in the area in 1956.

    The Church completed and dedicated the Boston Massachusetts Temple in 2000, marking the 100th operating temple in the Church.

    Yugoslavia recognized The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as a legal entity in 1975. In the same year, Church leaders formed Yugoslavia's first Latter-day Saint congregation in Zadar.

    Kresimir Cosic, a Yugoslavian student and basketball player at Church-owned Brigham Young University, became a member of the Church. Cosic returned to Yugoslavia to coach and to play on the Yugoslavian Olympic Team. Cosic earned a gold medal in basketball in 1980. In 1992, Cosic was appointed the deputy ambassador to the United States from Croatia.

    Between 1993 and 1998, the Church provided thousands of tons of food, clothing, bedding and medical supplies to Croatia. Since 1995 the Church has participated in a project to assist Croatian farmers.

    In May 2009, Elder D. Todd Christofferson, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, visited Croatia during a trip to the Balkans and dedicated the first Church-built meetinghouse in the country, also located in Zagreb.

    In September 2012, Elder Russell M. Nelson, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, visited the Church members in Zagreb and presided at meetings in this same meetinghouse.

    For Journalist use only:

    Adriatic North Mission

    Address: Trg Petra Svacica 3/1 10000 Zagreb  CROATIA

    Telephone : +385 145 77 783

    Email

    In September 2010, Russell M. Nelson, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, and a small group of members assembled in the Roman ruins of Doclea and dedicated the land of Montenegro. Following the dedication, the first group of members was organized.

    For journalist use only:

    Adriatic North Mission

    Address: Trg Petra Svacica 3/1 10000 Zagreb  CROATIA

    Telephone : +385 145 77 783

    Email

    Possibly the first missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Florida was Phineas Young, who served a two-month mission in 1845. The first missionaries were not well-received. From 1869 to 1929 law officers met each train arriving in Tallahassee and prevented Latter-day Saint elders from getting off. As late as 1895, history notes that two elders were arrested and given the choice to leave or pay a $200 fine. In 1898, one Church congregational leader was murdered. In spite of such persecution, missionaries continued to preach in Florida. The state's first official Church congregation was created in Jefferson County in 1897. By 1904 there were 1,230 Church members in Florida.

    Church growth in Florida was slow until Latter-day Saints from the West moved to Florida, drawn by a strong commerce and the aerospace industry.

    In 1854, four missionaries for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints serving in California were sent to labor in the Washington and Oregon territories. Enough converts joined to form a congregation along the Lewis River. During those early years, animosity against the Church members was so strong in Washington that when one convert died in 1911, her grave was dedicated secretly at night.

    Many Church members helped with Washington's railroad construction for the Northern Pacific Oregon Short Line in the 1880s. In 1930, Church membership in Washington was 1,900 in eight congregations, with chapels in Everett, Spokane, Seattle, and Olympia. Many members flocked to the state with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam on the Columbia River in the early 1940s. A temple was completed in Seattle in 1980.

    The Spokane and Columbia River Washington Temples were completed and dedicated in 1999 and 2001, respectively.

    Latter-day Saint immigrants first arrived in San Francisco in 1846. They built communities in the area as they progressed toward the Great Basin. In January 1847, the Mormon Battalion, a group of Latter-day Saints preparing to fight in the Mexican-American War, arrived in San Diego. Six Battalion members were at Sutter's Mill in January 1848, when gold was discovered.

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints colony of New Hope was founded in 1850. The first Church building was completed that same year. In 1851, Church leaders encouraged colonization in San Bernardino to augment a travel route from the coast for Utah-bound Saints. The land boom of the 1920s also attracted many members to California. Today, along with several temples, California has more missions than any other state. Additionally, members have cooperated to provide relief for communities after earthquakes, fires, and floods.

    In 1847, early members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints took their westward trek through Wyoming from Fort Laramie, following the Oregon Trail along the Platte River, to Fort Bridger. As pioneers repaired wagons at Fort Laramie, Church President Brigham Young celebrated his 46th birthday. The pioneers used rafts and a boat to ferry themselves and their belongings across the Platte River near present-day Casper. Nine men stayed behind to continue the profitable ferry, which found business from Oregon-bound travelers.

    In Wyoming, the pioneers met Jim Bridger, who gave an optimistic opinion of the Great Basin area. Most pioneer companies traveled through Wyoming without incident; however, the Willie and Martin Handcart Companies of 1857 started later in the year and became trapped in the winter snows. Approximately 200 of the 1,075 in the companies died. Others were saved by Utah rescue parties. In 1877, Church members settled the Star Valley area, and the following year, Church President Brigham Young dedicated the spot as a gathering place for members.

    In 1992, Wyoming Latter-day Saints erected three monuments in memory of the Willie and Martin Handcart Companies. Later, the Church purchased land at the mouth of Sweetwater Canyon where 21 pioneers died in one night. These sites were dedicated by Church President Gordon B. Hinckley.

    The first branch (small congregation) of the Church in Bosnia and Herzegovina was organized in Sarajevo by Elder Russell M. Nelson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles in September 2010. He met with members of the Church in Vraca Memorial Park in Sarajevo to dedicate the land of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The dedication site was symbolically near the border between the two political entities that make up Bosnia and Herzegovina: the Republika Srpska and the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    In 2012, FamilySearch, a genealogical research service provided by the Family History Department of the LDS Church, worked with the Orthodox Church in Sarajevo to preserve parish records of births, baptisms, marriages, and deaths that occurred in Sarajevo from 1700–1945. FamilySearch digitized approximately 250,000 images.

    In February 2012, the Church was registered as a non-profit organization, and in August 2012, the government of Bosnia and Herzegovina officially recognized the Church as a religious association. In September 2012, Elder Ronald A. Rasband, a senior leader of the LDS Church, along with Edward B. Rowe, president of the Adriatic North Mission, met with Zelijko Komssic, one of the three-member presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Rasband expressed appreciation for the many government officials who had worked with the Church to assist it in becoming a registered religious association.

    The second branch of the Church in Bosnia and Herzegovina was organized in Banja Luka in March 2013. There were approximately 73 Church members in two small congregations in Bosnia and Herzegovina in October 2020.

    For journalist use only:

    Adriatic North Mission

    Address: Trg Petra Svacica 3/1 10000 Zagreb  CROATIA

    Telephone : +385 145 77 783

    Email

    When the first company of Latter-day Saint pioneers began to journey westward, they did not know their end destination. But on 24 July 1847, when the wagons rolled out of the canyon into the Salt Lake Valley, their destination became apparent. "It is enough," Church President Brigham Young said as he viewed the valley below. "This is the right place. Drive on." Young named the area "Deseret," meaning honeybee, signifying the hive of activity that would soon inhabit the area. The President stayed only 33 days before returning to Winter Quarters in Nebraska to assist other families on their trek. At least 236 pioneer companies of approximately 60,000 pioneers crossed the plains for Utah. With time, they transformed the desert valley into the bustling and prosperous Salt Lake City.

    Several historic sites exist in the state today, including Temple Square, visited by nearly 5 million people annually. The Tabernacle Choir at Temple Square performs a weekly broadcast from one of the largest timber-roofed buildings in the world. The broadcast is the longest continuous broadcast program in the United States. In addition to the Salt Lake Temple, which took early members more than 40 years to complete, 16 other temples dot the state. Seven more temples are announced or under construction.

     

    Africa

    Total Church Membership

    Members
    Congregations

    666,508

    Members

    2,327

    Congregations

    Missions

    35Missions

    Family History Centers

    343

    Temples

    4Temples

    Asia

    Total Church Membership

    Members
    Congregations

    1,230,515

    Members

    2,130

    Congregations

    Missions

    44Missions

    Family History Centers

    354

    Temples

    8Temples

    Europe

    Total Church Membership

    Members
    Congregations

    497,436

    Members

    1,374

    Congregations

    Missions

    34Missions

    Family History Centers

    654

    Temples

    14Temples

    North America

    Total Church Membership

    Members
    Congregations

    9,419,307

    Members

    18,256

    Congregations

    Missions

    173Missions

    Family History Centers

    2,543

    Temples

    110Temples

    Oceania (Pacific)

    Total Church Membership

    Members
    Congregations

    572,895

    Members

    1,283

    Congregations

    Missions

    17Missions

    Family History Centers

    304

    Temples

    10Temples

    South America

    Total Church Membership

    Members
    Congregations

    4,178,375

    Members

    5,570

    Congregations

    Missions

    95Missions

    Family History Centers

    1,000

    Temples

    21Temples